KEEP ON KEEPING ON: Three ways to turn that possibility into a probability

“I contradict myself. I am large. I contain multitudes.” -Walt Whitman

 

It’s incredible what the mind can do- human or otherwise.

We’ve gone from mapping the stars to discovering them; where once we thought we were the center of the universe, we’re now readying up for interplanetary voyages. IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES…

…and yet, here lies the problem.

Whatever we’ve wished to gain, we do so by sacrificing a part of who we are- be that happiness, time, people and relationships. So based on the above, and the very little life experience that I’ve had, I’ve decided to write about how each on of us could do better to turn our lives around!

1. Detach yourself from the negative

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Didn’t grasp that? I’m happy to break it down for you:

We’re afraid of detachment. 

The term ‘detachment’ here cannot be used lightly; it refers to animate,inaminate and psychological objects within a lifetime. Some examples to the same are old watches given to you by someone from your family, your first currency note, a watch, memories, etc. However, the thing that differentiates how we treat each one of these objects is how much value  we associate with it. This value stems from an emotional construct- one that is felt every time there’s a concourse of actions made to/towards the object.

Growing up, I was taught by my parents, who learned from their parents, to never let go of the things that have ‘value’. But what they failed to mention was that there’s always a condition- more items, more value; more value, more clutter. And I don’t mean just things lying around, I mean mental clutter. it’s when these things start to hold negative connotations- run, Forest, run!

2. Establish a difference between regret and patience

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For those of you new to the concept of intrinsic psychology, there’s a very fine line between success and un-success (because failure is when you’ve give up). That thin line is merely the difference between regret and patience. The moment you start to question why you’re doing something, remember why you started in the first place. Sounds cliché, but it’s true. It’s a cliché because it’s true.

“When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you will be successful.” Eric Thomas

In the plethora of motivational speakers out there, I find that Eric Thomas is whom I connect with the most. He’s language is street, and his epithets are a work of art. In one of his talks, he defines pain as a temporary feeling; that it doesn’t matter how much it hurts, except to remind of you how much more it would hurt if you were to give up now. Why stop now, when you’ve put in all this effort?

3. Always solve for one variable at a time

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During my GMAT study, I learned an incredulous life lesson- when you’re reading a wordy, complex question, solve for one variable at a time. Forget how good you are at multitasking, because frankly you’re not.  All you’re doing is focusing on one variable in shorter spurts of time. Take the time that you need to work on that one area.

“When climbing up the highest mountain, remember to smell the flowers on your way up.  -unknown

So here they are! These points are the visors to your life, and are extremely valuable when it comes to pushing yourself through the hardest of times. Remember-don’t let it go, and keep on keeping on.

 

#6SM 

#triathleteinmotion

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